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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

HAIR PROBLEMS

Description:

There are many different kinds of hair problems, from dry or oily hair to premature hair loss, but most are linked to what you eat. Oily hair can occur with vitamin B deficiency. Dry or brittle hair is often a sign of essential fat deficiency. Poor hair growth, or loss of colour, is a sign of zinc deficiency. Hair loss is connected with general nutritional deficiency, especially a lack of iron, vitamin B1, vitamin C or lysine (an amino acid). Some hair supplements contain all these. Massaging the scalp also helps, as does hanging upside down, including headstands and ‘inversion’ poses in yoga, which improve circulation to the scalp. The combination of optimum nutrition, stimulating scalp circulation and correcting underlying hormonal imbalances has proved the most effective answer for hair loss. Unfortunately there is no answer yet for grey hair, or any apparent connection with nutrition. 

Diet advice

Follow the diet recommended in this book. Make sure you do not go short of essential fats and water. Avoid sugar and stimulants like tea, coffee and chocolate. 
 
Supplements

• 2 x Multivitamin and multimineral (with 10mg iron and 10mg zinc)

• 2 x Essential Omega 3 and 6 oil capsules

• 2 x Vitamin C 1,000mg

• Lysine 1000mg (for hair loss only)

HANGOVERS

Description:

The symptoms of excess alcohol are half dehydration and half intoxication. Once the liver’s ability to detoxify alcohol is exceeded the body produces a toxic substance and it is this that brings about a headache. The advice below, if followed before drinking, will reduce any ‘morning after’ symptoms. So will drinking masses of liquid, which dilutes the alcohol. Needless to say, drinking large amounts of alcohol is not optimum nutrition! 

Diet advice

Follow the recommendations in this book. Eat pure foods that will not add to the body’s toxic burden. Fruit and vegetable juices, high in antioxidants, are very beneficial, as is lots of water – 2 litres (31/2 pints) in a day. Also drink cat’s claw tea. 
 
Supplements

• 2 x Multivitamin and multimineral (preferably with molybdenum)

• 6 × Vitamin C 1,000mg (1 every two hours) 

• 3 × Antioxidant complex

• L-glutamine powder, 5g in water

HAY FEVER

Description:

Even though allergic reactions to pollen are the identified cause of hay fever, other factors make one person more likely to sneeze than another. The incidence of hay fever has risen dramatically in cities compared to rural areas, which led to the discovery that pollutants such as exhaust fumes prime the immune system to react. During the summer the air in polluted areas contains more free radicals due to the action of sunlight on oxygen molecules, so city-dwellers breathe in more pollutants. Taking a good all-¬round antioxidant supplement containing vitamins A, C and E, betacarotene, selenium and zinc, plus the amino acids cysteine, cysteine or glutathione, helps increase your resistance (the most effective form of these amino acids is N-Acetyl Cysteine, sometimes called NAC, and ‘reduced’ glutathione). The amino acid methionine, in combination with calcium, is an effective anti-histamine. You need to take 500mg of l-methionine with 400mg of calcium twice a day. Vitamin C helps to control excessive histamine levels. Vitamin B6 and zinc have a role to play in balancing histamine levels and strengthening the immune system. Vitamin B5 helps reduce symptoms.
The three most common substances reacted to are pollen, wheat and milk. Although there is no proven connection, it is interesting to note that all these are originally grass products. It may be that some hay fever sufferers become sensitised to proteins that are common to grains, grasses and possibly milk. In any event, dairy products encourage mucus production. Similarly, modern strains of wheat are high in gluten, which irritates the digestive tract and stimulates mucus production. 

Diet advice

Avoid or at least limit wheat, dairy products and alcohol. Eat plenty of antioxidant-rich fruit and vegetables, plus seeds rich in selenium and zinc. Where possible, avoid exposure to pollen and traffic fumes. 
 
Supplements

• 2 x Multivitamin and multimineral (providing B6 100mg and zinc 15mg)

• 2 x Antioxidant complex 

• 3 × Vitamin C 1,000mg 
If you are really suffering try . . .

• L-methionine 500mg twice a day

• Calcium 400mg twice a day

• Pantothenic acid 500mg twice a day

HEADACHES AND MIGRAINES

Description:
There are many causes of headaches and migraines, ranging from blood sugar drops, dehydration and allergy to stress and tension, or a critical combination. Peaks and troughs in adrenalin and blood sugar can bring on a headache. Often they go away with optimum nutrition. If they persist, look carefully at the possibility of allergy. See if you can notice any correlation between the foods you eat and the incidence of headaches. 
For migraine sufferers, instead of taking an aspirin, or migraine drugs that constrict the blood vessels, try taking 100–200mg of vitamin B3 in the niacin form, which is a vasodilator. Start with the smaller dose: this will often stop or reduce a migraine in the early stages. It is best to do this at home in a relaxed environment, so the customary warm blushing sensation will probably not bother you. 
 
Diet advice

Eat little and often and avoid long periods without food, especially if you are stressed or tense. Also make sure you drink regularly. Avoid sugar and stimulants like tea, coffee and chocolate. 
 
Supplements

• 2 x Multivitamin and multimineral

• Vitamin C 1,000mg 
• B3 niacin 100mg

HERPES

Description:
The herpes virus feeds off an amino acid called arginine. If you supplement lysine, an amino acid that looks like arginine, you fool the virus and effectively starve it. I recommend supplementing 1,000mg of lysine every day, away from food, to keep the virus at bay. When you have an active infection, supplement 3,000mg of lysine a day and cut right back on foods rich in arginine, which include beans, lentils, nuts and chocolate. The more stressed you are, the weaker your immune system becomes and the more chances the virus has to become active. A good way to boost your immune system is to supplement 2g of vitamin C every day. Some people also find MSM reduces an infection. Worth trying if lysine doesn’t clear things up. 
 
Diet advice 

Avoid arginine rich foods during an attack. These include beans, lentils, nuts and chocolate. 
 
Supplements

• 2 x Multivitamin and mineral

• 2 x Vitamin C 1,000mg

• 1 × Lysine 1,000mg (take 3g a day during active infection)

• 1 x MSM 1,000mg (take 3g a day during active infection)

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

Description:

Hypertension or high blood pressure can be caused by atherosclerosis (a narrowing and thickening of the arteries), arterial tension or thicker blood. Arterial tension is controlled by the balance of calcium, magnesium and potassium in relation to sodium (salt). Stress also plays a part. Correcting this balance can lower blood pressure in thirty days. Vitamins C and E and fish oils high in EPA and DHA help to keep the blood thin. To reverse atherosclerosis, see page 000. 

Diet advice

Follow the diet recommended in this book. Avoid salt and foods with added salt. Increase your intake of fruit (eat at least three pieces a day) and vegetables, which are rich in potassium. Take a tablespoon of ground seeds as a source of extra calcium and magnesium. Unless you are vegetarian, eat poached, grilled or baked tuna, salmon, herring or mackerel twice a week.

 
Supplements

• 2 x Multivitamin and multimineral

• Antioxidant

• 2 × Vitamin C 1,000mg

• Bone mineral complex (providing 500mg calcium and 300mg magnesium) 

• EPA/DHA fish oils 1,200–2,400mg or eat oily fish

• Providing vitamin E 400mg